Blog

Painless Language Fluency: 5 Tips for Language Translators

Posted on Fri, Jul 18, 2014 @ 16:07 PM

language translatorSince language is a translator’s livelihood, they can’t afford to let their skills slip. Sure, translators regularly work with their target/source language, but time constraints and never-ending deadlines often keep them from keeping up with the latest colloquialisms and cultural trends. Here are 5 simple ways you can keep your second, third or fourth language skills sharp:  

Painless Language Fluency: 5 Tips for Language Translators

Listen to audio books in your target language
According to a 2012 study report by Texas A&M, the average American commuter spends the equivalent of a week at work stuck in traffic every year! How about those of us that reside in large cities like Washington D.C and Los Angeles? According to the same study, D.C. and L.A. commuters spend a whopping 67 and 61 hours stuck in traffic, respectively.

This is a long way of saying that commuters have a lot of idle time they can use productively by listening to audio books in their target language. Granted, many translators work from home…but even so, consider how much time you spend in the car or on the train just running random errands every week!

Keep a notebook in your target language.

Do you keep a journal or a blog? If you do, switch from writing in your first language to your target language.  This is a good way to keep your grammar and vocabulary skills sharp.

Join a language group
Odds are that there are people in your community who want to improve or maintain the same target language that you do. We’re members of a Meetup group called the Metro-Detroit Spanish Speakers. Each group is unique, but ours meets once a week at a local coffee shop to hang out, speak Spanish, and enjoy drinks amongst friends.

Teach your target language at a community college
If you live in the States, have a master’s degree, and are fluent in another language, you can teach at the community college level. Teaching will not only improve your mastery of your target language, it will also give you another source of income and get you out of the office for a few hours every week!

Become a community volunteer
Obviously, volunteering for local charities is good for the community, but it can also benefit translators who want to practice their target language. Here in Detroit, for example, there is a large Spanish-speaking community on the south-west side of the city called Mexicantown. Most of the community speaks our target language and offers a variety of opportunities for us to put our passion for language and helping others to good use.

Download our exclusive guide:  Translation and the Empathetic Imagination

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

5 Productivity Hacks for Language Translators

Posted on Fri, Jul 11, 2014 @ 13:07 PM

language translatorThroughout the day, language translators are bombarded by distractions—some of them self-induced, some of them not. Over the years, I’ve incorporated a few productivity hacks into my routine; they’ve served me well, so I thought I’d share some of them with you.

5 Productivity Hacks for Language Translators

Set your priorities and write them down
I like keeping to-do lists for a couple reasons. First, they help me remember and prioritize my tasks; just as important, though, is the feeling of satisfaction I get when I scribble a hard line through the task once it’s completed

Set your iPhone to “Do Not Disturb” mode
My cell phone is one of the biggest sources of distraction, but thanks to “Do Not Disturb” mode, I am able to silence calls, texts, notifications and alerts from every app and contact without blocking a specific person. If you’re unsure of how to activate this feature, click here.

Adopt an e-mail efficiency plan
Email can suck you right into a time warp (as can Facebook).  Keep your communications to-the-point and brief. Use the features your email system provides: highlight emails that need your immediate attention as opposed to those that can sit in the inbox for a little while. Here’s another idea: Log out of your email and only check it at specific times throughout the day.

Much of what you do is boiler plate in terms of rates/deadlines/review/approval periods, etc. Have descriptions typed out and cut/paste them into replies to save yourself from reinventing the wheel.

Rethink the way you spend your idle time
Down time is essential to your health and sanity, but many of us squander it on impulsive (as opposed to substantial) indulgences. Take time-sucker websites like Facebook, Pinterest, Tumbler and YouTube. For many of us, typing in the URL to these sites has become a reflexive act: we don’t even know we’re doing it. What’s worse, we passively spend hours a week on these sites without being able to recall a single moment of it. Why not skip passive activities like this for more quality engagement with family, friends, our pets and ourselves?

Can’t control your Web-browsing habit? There’s an app for that!
If you have trouble controlling your web-browsing habit like I do, give Write Room a shot. Basically, Write Room eliminates every opportunity for distraction by transforming your screen into a green and black basic word-processing page. Although WriteRoom won't allow you to create fancy layouts or insert tables and graphs, it will help you stay on track and get words on the page.

For those of you who REALLY can’t control your web-browsing habit…
Check SelfControl, a free Mac OS X (10.5 or above) app that allows language translators to block websites, mail servers, or anything else on the Internet. Simply set the period of time to block, add sites to your blacklist, and click "Start." But keep in mind that you won’t be able to cheat; once you’ve set the time, it can’t be disabled. 

Stop working beyond the point of productivity
I used to ignore that ache in my brain that was telling me to stop working and take a break. It took me a while to realize this, but productivity and time are not synonymous. In other words, just because I was working for long stretches of time didn’t mean that I was necessarily being efficient or productive. I may “lose” fifteen minutes by walking away to brew a fresh pot of coffee or take a short walk around the block, but when I come back, I’m usually refreshed and ready to get back to work. 

 

Download our exclusive guide:  Translation and the Empathetic Imagination

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator, time management for translators

25 Marketing Tips for Freelance Translators

Posted on Fri, Jun 27, 2014 @ 09:06 AM

 freelance translator

Language translators must consistently churn out quality translations, but equally important to their success is how well they market themselves and connect with others in the field. Below you’ll find 25 simple steps you can take to successfully (and tastefully) promote your translation business. These tips have been adapted from M. Eta Trabing’s 2006 article, Running Your Translating/Interpreting Business From Home.

  • Print business cards and make sure that they are both unique and consistently branded. In other words, your business card design should align with branding you use on your website and blog 

  • Write an error-free curriculum vitae. Translators need a resume for translators; you really shouldn’t use the same CV you used to get hired at all of your other jobs. If you are looking for a step-by-step guide to putting together a translation CV, Corinne McKay’s book How to Succeed as a Freelance Translator can walk you through the entire process. Here’s a little secret though: Almost as helpful, not to mention entirely free, is Translators Café: Here you browse hundreds of resumes posted by active freelance translators. See how an experienced translator has done it first and model yours after the pros

  • Don’t wait for opportunities—create your own! Start by making cold calls to companies in your specialty

  • Don’t believe the hype: “Networking” is not a dirty word

  • When you meet good prospects, don’t sit on them. Make calls and write follow-up emails

  • Send thank you cards to clients at the end of the year

  • Ask others (anyone!) to refer you and refer others!

  • Help other translators. They will help you back

  • Ask busy translators if you can subcontract for them, but never “steal” their clients

  • When you are not translating, tweak your marketing strategy. This means, revisiting your CV, writing blog posts, reaching out to potential clients and connecting with other translators

  • Send out reminders about your services to clients you haven’t heard from in a while

  • Invest in dictionaries for particular services. They will pay for themselves in the long run

  • Never oversell your services—especially if you are not qualified for a specific kind of service

  • Prepare your rates and terms of payment. Rates can vary for different types of clients (agencies, direct clients, pro bono). Occasionally, you can barter your services

  • Realize that you are not limited by geographic boundaries. Thanks to the Internet, clients are everywhere

  • Be available in your clients’ time zones

  • Deliver strong, consistent work every single time, regardless of what you are getting paid and how you feel about the client

  • Never stop learning. Never stop honing your skills

  • Research the area you live in for prospective clients

  • Check the Blue Pages of the telephone book (listing all the government, federal, state, county, and city agencies) for potential sources for jobs

  • Read foreign newspapers online, watch foreign films, listen to foreign music, and keep up with business information and terminology

  • Let everyone know when you move or change email addresses or telephone numbers
  • Be available upon short notice, but never take on a job if you have concerns about deadlines

  • Offer alternate solutions that will save clients money

  • Keep track of your clients’ accomplishments and congratulate them when necessary

Download our exclusive guide:  Translation and the Empathetic Imagination

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

Breaking Up with Clients: 6 Tips for Freelance Translators

Posted on Thu, Jun 19, 2014 @ 15:06 PM

freelance translatorWe want to be there for our clients and build lasting, mutually-beneficial relationships with them. But when clients become high-maintenance—they start demanding immediate responses to emails sent at 7:00 a.m. on a Sunday, they try to renegotiate rates, or fail to pay us on time—it doesn’t take long for us to lose our patience.

Breaking up is never pleasant, but here are a few things you should keep in mind if you decide it’s time to end your professional relationship with a client.

Give a two-week notice: You may not need this client anymore to make ends meet, but always give him or her a two-week notice so that s/he has time to find a replacement, tie up loose ends with you, and take care of any outstanding balances.

Finish all of the projects you’ve accepted: Your reputation is only as good as your word. Always hold up your end of the bargain and finish projects that you’ve accepted.

Offer referrals: This client may not be a good match for you, but perhaps you know a few language translators who are not bothered by last-minute deadlines or what you consider to be a lazy, disorganized project manager. Help out your client by offering a few referrals and s/he may return the favor.

Be professional: Avoid attacking a client or writing long-winded emails. Just as important, if your client is defensive or angry, resist the urge to get the last word in. There’s no reason to perpetuate a back-and-forth email argument.

Keep it clear, concise, and definitive: If you’re serious about getting out, be clear, concise and definitive in your messaging. Don’t imply that you’d be open to “working things out” if you know darn well that you have no intention of doing so. There’s a caveat to this, which we’ll get to below.

Be open to negotiation: Some clients have no idea how difficult they are and may be self-reflective enough to see this as an opportunity to grow and nurture your professional relationship. In this case, it may behoove you to work things out.

Photo credit: bored-now / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)


Download our exclusive guide:  Translation and the Empathetic Imagination

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

10 Golden Rules for Freelance Translators

Posted on Thu, Jun 05, 2014 @ 09:06 AM

freelance translator 2Give a rough estimate before you formally quote a job
Always offer the prospective client a ballpark figure over the phone; then submit a formal quote later. Why? It takes care of pricing issues right off the bat. Sending a quote later on gives the client the opportunity to shop around for another translator. Naturally, you don’t want that to happen.

Never accept deadline or project that you can’t deliver
If your specialization is not pharmaceuticals, you probably shouldn’t accept a pharmaceutical project. The same goes for a deadline: if you know that you can’t make it, say so up front. Turning down work does not automatically disqualify you for other projects. It simply demonstrates that you know your field and limits.

More about deadlines and extensions
Under usual circumstances, you’re a well-organized and reliable translator. But what happens when something unexpected comes up and you know you’re not going to be able to meet a deadline?

  • First, contact the project manager or client immediately. If the client knows early enough, s/he may be able to negotiate an extension. The longer you wait, the less likely it will be for the client to give you an extension—and more business in the future
  • Second, if you know there is absolutely no wiggle room on the extension, turn to a trusted friend.  You should have at least one trusted language translator you can turn to when you’re in a bind. You may lose money on the deal, but you’ll lose even more money in the long run if you back out of a project.

Look at the source files immediately
Have you ever opened up a file that looked something like this?

freelance translator

This should go without saying, but it’s better to find out that your source file is corrupt on the day you accept the assignment than it is to find out later. 

More about source files
Usually translators receive two sets of files: one set is sent with the initial inquiry, the other is sent with the work order. Documents sent with the initial inquiry may be “final” versions, but don’t assume that they are. Always, always, always work with the files sent to you in the official work order!

Don’t be afraid to ask questions
If you have questions, ask—but it’s best to compile all of your questions and send them off in one email. If something comes up, you can always send more questions, of course. Here are a few questions we ask right off the bat:

  • How many words/pages are in the document?
  • In what format is it?
  • What’s the subject matter (ask for specific details)
  • In what format is the translation needed?
  • What is the deadline? Is there any wiggle room with the deadline?
  • Does the client have any reference material or existing translations?

On invoices
Here are a few things to keep in mind when it comes to sending invoices. These tips come from Enas Ibrahim’s article in the most recent issue of the ATA Chronicle.

  • Make sure the invoice number is not a duplicate—this is not only confusing, but may result in rejection and delay of payment
  • Make sure that your company name and address are included on the invoice. This should be a no-brainer, but it’s a common misstep
  • If you are working with a project manager, include his/her name on the invoice
  • If you have more than one payment method, indicate this on the invoice, along with the payment method you prefer

 

Download our exclusive guide:  Translation and the Empathetic Imagination

 

 

Photo credit: Martin Deutsch / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Portions of this blog have been adapted from Enas Ibrahim’s article, "11 Tips for Freelance Translators from a Project Manager."

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

Make Friends…Not Contacts: 10 Tips for Language Translators

Posted on Tue, May 27, 2014 @ 06:05 AM

Being a successful freelance translator is a fabulous thing! You get to set your own schedule, create a palette of regular clients with whom you work well, and can often work in your pajamas for the entire day. The flip side to freelance work is that without proper attention and maintenance, your network, your skills and job viability can begin to shrink.

freelance translatorMake Friends…Not Contacts: 10 Tips for Language Translators

Help Others. You know the old saying, "You learn the best when you teach others?" Well, you network the best when you are networking for others. The more that you work with, and assist, your fellow freelance translators, the more likely they will be to think of you - or provide requested assistance - when it's your turn to need a helping hand.

Attended an industry event. Podcasts and webinars are helpful, but if you’re serious about increasing your visibility, you really need to attend industry events in the flesh. Not sure where to go? You’ll find a comprehensive list of translation conferences here.

Invite Guest Bloggers. One of the best networking tools is to read and share your favorite translation blogs and/or websites. Find a handful of freelance translators with great websites and then offer your appreciation of their work by inviting them to guest blog. Then offer to do the same for them. This is a win-win for everyone.

Reach out to your old classmates. If you went to university, chances are that you were surrounded by peers who shared similar goals and career aspirations. What have they been up to? Where are they working? Who are they translating for? Meet up for coffee, find them on Facebook and pick their brains.

Hone Your Initial Contact Skills. Don't you just love long-winded introductory phone calls, or spending 10 minutes reading novel-length emails from strangers? Right. Nor do the people you're contacting for the first time. Keep introductions brief, get to the point, and respect their time by asking, "is this a good time?" If not, they'll be more likely to re-schedule.

Pass it On. Did you read a great book you know Translator X would love? Did you just learn a new trick others in your network would benefit from? Send them a copy. Pass helpful links via email. Share your tricks and lucky finds so others will keep you in the loop when they have helpful materials to share.

Forge Connections. Introduce people in your network whom you know would benefit from one another. Connect like-minded people. Share contacts in Foreign Country A with someone you know who is traveling there.

Follow Up. Did you just make a new connection? Follow up a day or two later with an email or voice mail to express your appreciation for the conversation about ________, and re-invigorate their impression of you.

Start retweeting. Twitter is a great tool for spreading the word about your blog and translation services, but never forget that social networking isn’t all about you! Start retweeting other language translator’s tweets. This is an easy way to generate content and provide your followers with useful professional information. Furthermore, it’s a great way to nurture relationships with fellow language translators.

Volunteer. When you put yourself out there in the community, or in someone else's community, it's provides the prime opportunity to forge new relationships with people you might not have met otherwise.

Building a healthy professional network can be the key to keeping viable work coming your way, and ensuring you deliver the most current and professional translation work for your clients.

Photo credit: _Untitled-1 / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)


Download our exclusive guide:  Translation and the Empathetic Imagination

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

10 More of the Best Quotes for Language Translators

Posted on Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 10:04 AM

Over the past clanguage translatorouple of years, I’ve been collecting any sort of quote or aphorism that relates to language translation. This week, I browsed my list and grabbed 10 of my favorite quotes to share with you.

10 More of the Best Quotes for Language Translators

“It is the task of the translator to release in his own language that pure language that is under the spell of another, to liberate the language imprisoned in a work in his re-creation of that work.”
Walter Benjamin

“In antiquity, for instance, one of the dominant images of the translators was that of a builder: his (usually it was him, not her) task was to carefully demolish a building, a structure (the source text), carry the bricks somewhere else (into the target culture), and construct a new building - with the same bricks.”
Andrew Chesterman

“Translation is that which transforms everything so that nothing changes.”
Günter Grass

“I just enjoy translating, it's like opening one's mouth and hearing someone else's voice emerge.”
Iris Murdoch

“The first rule of translation: make sure you know at least one of the bloody languages!”
Faiz Ahmad Faiz

“Without translation, we would be living in provinces bordering on silence.”

George Steiner

"Translation is not a matter of words only: it is a matter of making intelligible a whole culture." ―Anthony Burgess


"The best thing on translation was said by Cervantes: translation is the other side of a tapestry."
Leonardo Sciascia

"To translate, one must have a style of his own, for the translation will have no rhythm or nuance, which come from the process of artistically thinking through and molding the sentences; they cannot be reconstituted by piecemeal imitation. The problem of translation is to retreat to a simpler tenor of one’s own style and creatively adjust this to one’s author."
Paul Goodman

"A translator is the most observant reader. Watching a life of the book under a different cultural context, with respect to other people is for me a great adventure and challenge. I enormously respect the translators’ arduous, solitary and unrewarding work."
Agata Tuszynska

Click me

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

5 Things Every Freelance Language Translator Should Know

Posted on Wed, Apr 02, 2014 @ 15:04 PM

freelance translatorWhether you’re already a freelance translator, or a translator thinking about going freelance, we thought you might benefit from a few tips we picked up from Steve Gordon, Jr.’s book, 100 Habits of Successful Freelance Designers: Insider Secrets for Working Smart & Staying Creative.

Going solo doesn’t mean you can’t be part of a team
Very often freelancers go solo because they want to escape the office banter, the “water cooler” chatter, and the constant interruptions. Ironically enough, after experiencing freelance isolation, it’s not uncommon for many of us to start missing these social interactions. Just remember: Going solo doesn’t mean you need to live in isolation.

Try renting a desk in an office once or twice a week through ShareDesk. That way you’ll still be surrounded by people, but you won’t be locked into a monthly lease.

Another suggestion that we’ve mentioned before: Connect with an accountability partner, someone you can call or email in the morning to report on what you’ll be working on for the next four or five hours. Then around lunchtime, call back and give a brief “account” of what you accomplished. This will keep you productive and connected.

There’s no such thing as talking too much
As the adage goes, it is impolite to talk about one’s self, but when you’re a freelancer you’d do well to throw that philosophy out the window.

Tell everyone what you do for a living. By talking about your work, you enhance the industry, educate the public, practice your pitch, and may even get a fun project in the process.

Keep that day job—for now
One of the best ways to start off as a freelancer is to keep a full-time day job and take on freelance work that you can do on nights and weekends. Try to build up projects and clients until you have a flow of steady work and enough jobs to keep you busy for at least six months.

It will take a lot of hard work and dedication to do this because you’re basically working two full-time jobs, but the benefits will be well worth it in the end. The biggest benefit is that all the stress and long hours will help prepare you for going solo, managing clients, and dealing with deadlines. Plus you’ll already have a roster of stable clients.

Remember the old Boy Scout motto: “Be prepared.”
Hopefully, if you regularly spend four to eight hours a week developing your business, you won’t experience harsh dry spells.

When you’re working on projects and have a lot of deadlines to keep track of, it can seem strange or silly to pull hours away from a client to work on business development and marketing. But doing so is critical because the work you do to promote yourself this week may not pay off for weeks, months, even years down the road. You have to always keep yourself in front of people and remind them that you’re available.

Learn the art of negotiation
You set your rates where they are for a reason, so don’t accept a counter offer if it isn’t fair. Instead, negotiate by doing one of the following:

  • Offer to get the job done faster: Many clients would gladly pay extra to wrap a project a week early just so they don’t have to worry about it.
  • Offer a discount for paying your full fee in advance: Getting paid in advance is a rare treat. If the client can’t (or won’t) meet you exactly where you want, accept a lower rate for full payment in advance.
  • Ask for more time to get the project done: If you’re taking a job at a lower rate, ask if you can have an extension on the deadline.
  • Offer a bulk discount. Does the client have any upcoming projects that she could offer you? If so, take on those projects and offer a bulk discount.


    Click me

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

5 Questions Language Translators Should Ask Themselves When Business Dries Up

Posted on Fri, Mar 28, 2014 @ 13:03 PM

language translatorWe never look forward to dry spells, but experience has shown us that they can actually work in our favor. Why? Because they give us time to reflect, assess our business strategy, and figure out what’s working and what’s not.

To get back on track, we always start by asking ourselves these five questions:  

When was the last time I attended an industry event?
Podcasts and webinars are helpful, but if you’re serious about increasing your visibility, you really need to attend industry events in the flesh. Not sure where to go? You’ll find a comprehensive list of translation conferences here.

Am I truly connecting with others?
I used to groan when I was within earshot of anyone using the word “network.” That changed when I finally realized that there’s a difference between disingenuous talk and meaningful conversation. Networking isn’t dirty or selfish. To the contrary, real networking stems from a genuine desire to learn something about the other person.  

If you’re truly networking—whether it be through social media, blog comments or in person at conferences—you’re building a relationship, you’re finding out what you have in common with someone else, you’re learning how you can help them and how they can help you.

When was the last time I spoke to my classmates?
If you went to university, chances are that you were surrounded by peers who shared similar goals and career aspirations. What have they been up to? Where are they working? Who are they translating for? Meet up for coffee, find them on Facebook and pick their brains.

Do I have any other industry experience? Can I use this experience to market myself?
We’ve known men and women who were copywriters, chefs, teachers, social media managers and web designers for years before they became language translators. Use your industry experience wisely. Are there any industry trade shows happening in your area? Browse the Internet for companies that align with your specialization and reach out to them.

When was the last time I (or someone else trustworthy) reviewed my marketing materials?
When I say “marketing materials,” I’m talking about your CV, your blog, your website, your LinkedIn profile and so on. Chances are that you are too close to your own marketing materials to look at them objectively. Appeal to your fellow language translators on the Proz message boards; there are lots of willing souls who will review your materials, offer advice and encourage you.

Who Knows You Webinar

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator

10 of the Best Quotes for Language Translators

Posted on Thu, Mar 20, 2014 @ 14:03 PM

language translatorI recently read a blog post by one of my favorite bloggers, Catherine Christakis. In this particular post, she included a collection of her favorite inspirational quotes for language translators. Over the past couple of years, I too have been collecting my favorite translation quotes and thought I’d share 10 of them.


10 of the Best Quotes for Language Translators


  • “So many people consider their work a daily punishment. Whereas I love my work as a translator. Translation is a journey over a sea from one shore to the other. Sometimes I think of myself as a smuggler: I cross the frontier of language with my booty of words, ideas, images, and metaphors.”
    Amara Lakhous

  • "I do not hesitate to read … all good books in translations. What is really best in any book is translatable—any real insight or broad human sentiment."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • “Writers make national literature, while translators make universal literature.”
    José Saramago
  • “It is better to have read a great work of another culture in translation than never to have read it at all.”
    ― Henry Gratton Doyle

  • “Translation is a two-edged instrument: it has the special purpose of demonstrating the learner's knowledge of the foreign language, either as a form of control or to exercise his intelligence in order to develop his competence.”
    Peter Newmark

  • “It is hard indeed to notice anything for which the languages available to us have no description.”

    Alan Wilson Watts
  • "Translators are the shadow heroes of literature, the often forgotten instruments that make it possible for different cultures to talk to one another, who have enabled us to understand that we all, from every part of the world, live in one world.”
    Paul Auster
  • “If laughter came in paste format you could squeeze out of a tube, I’ll bet nine out of ten dentists would recommend comedy before bed. The tenth doctor, having just read Tolstoy as deliberately mistranslated by Dora J. Arod, would probably recommend reading Russian literature before bed.”
    Jarod Kintz

  • The poet moves from life to language, the translator moves from language to life; both, like the immigrant, try to identify the invisible, what's between the lines, the mysterious implications.”
    Anne Michaels

  • "Say what we may of the inadequacy of translation, yet the work is and will always be one of the weightiest and worthiest undertakings in the general concerns of the world."
    J. W. Goethe
Download our exclusive guide:  Translation and the Empathetic Imagination

Topics: Modern Language Translation, Spanish Translation Course, French Translation Certification, Online Translation Certification Arabic, freelance translation, freelance translator, language translator, language translators

Subscribe via E-mail

MAT PROGRAM

Our Latest Guide

Most Popular Posts

On Demand Webinar

Latest Posts

Posts by category

Follow Me

New Programs