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How Relationships Get You Jobs, Customers and Opportunities

Posted on Wed, Jun 19, 2013 @ 09:06 AM

jocelyn giangrandeThe other day a consultant friend of mine told me that she was exhausted from trying to sell her services.  She found the process uncomfortable, taxing and in conflict with her style.  She also stated she was tired of hearing “no” which wasn’t helping her self-esteem.

Hating sales myself, I knew from where she was coming. Therefore I offered the following advice: “Stop selling and start engaging.“ 

Whether you’re selling services, products or skills for a job, no one wants to be sold to.  Think of the negative reputation of hard salespeople.  Although my friend wasn’t a hard salesperson, most people shut down when they think they’re being sold.  You get much further when you build relationships first.

Need more leads, customers or a job? Build engaging relationships.  Below are three ideas to consider:

  1. Change your mindset.  Don’t think “sell”, think “engage.” Therefore, try changes your focus to building relationships.  Network and connect with your potential customer base.  Going to lunch or having a cup of coffee to become better-acquainted works wonders in building connections. Spend time getting to know others and finding common ground.  People are more likely to buy from someone they know than an unknown.

  2. Get in front of your customer.  Think of ways to demonstrate what your offering so potential buyers can see it in action.  Many of us don’t know what we need until we see it.  This technique is used by infomercials.  Think of demonstrations at trade shows when the vacuum cleaner salesperson throws dirt on the floor and then cleans it up right in front of you.  They know that once you see it, you can’t live without it.  You can try the same technique.

  3. Do it for Free.  Accepting free engagements and volunteering has helped me build many connections and build credibility.  Although I’ve learned to be strategic about my selections, I never see volunteering as “doing it for free”.  Instead, I view it as advertising, exposure and a way to increase my contact base.  Don’t get me wrong; I still need to bring home a paycheck.  However, I volunteer when I can and I’m selective.  It’s also a great way to demonstrate your skills if you’re looking for a job.

Don’t get frustrated trying to sell your services, products or skills.  Instead, try engaging your potential customer by changing your mindset, getting in front of them or doing it for free.  You’ll be surprised how effective it can be. Better yet, it’s much more fun.  Good luck!

Our monthly guest blogger, Jocelyn Giangrande, is a Marygrove Human Resource Management alumna who not only owns her own company, SASHE, LLC, but has over 15 years of corporate experience. Her career advice and guidance have been featured in Women’s Day, HR Magazine; she is also the author of What’s In Your Sandwich? 10 Surefire Ingredients for Career Success.

 

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Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, HR professional, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, career success, networking tips

5 must-have apps for the HR professional

Posted on Fri, May 10, 2013 @ 16:05 PM

Mobile technology is here to stay and while you may not find many apps specifically designed for the HR professional, there are still hundreds of apps that anyone in the HRM field will find useful. If you’re a HR professional who is looking to boost productivity, stay organized, or collaborate with your team more efficiently, we’ve got five apps to help you out.  

HR professional turbo scanTurbo Scan ($1.99)
Have you ever noticed how long it takes to scan a single page on your desktop scanner? We have an HP All-in-One printer/scanner/fax machine and nothing tests our patience like this machine—especially when we have a twenty-page document to scan. But there’s more than time at stake when you use a desktop scanner: there’s also the fact that you have to be at your desk to use it. Skip all of this and give Turboscan a try.

Turboscan optimizes your iPhone’s built-in camera, turning it into a multipage scanner for documents, receipts, notes, whiteboards, and other text. With TurboScan, you can quickly scan your documents and store or email them as multipage PDF or JPEG files.

HR professional Good ReaderGood Reader ($4.99)
We love Good Reader for a couple of reasons. First off, it will successfully handle any document—huge PDF and TXT files, manuals, large books, magazines, and renderings of 100 MB and more—with great speed. HR professionals will also be happy to know that they can annotate their PDFs using typewriter text boxes, sticky notes, lines, arrows, and freehand drawings.

HR professional PrintfriendlyPrintfriendly (Free)
Technically, Printfriendly isn’t an app, but we use this website so often that it had to be on our list. How much paper and ink do you think your department wastes every day printing needless sidebar images and web page clutter? If you’d like to print clean pages and save paper, all you’ve got to do is copy and paste the webpage URL into Printfriendly. Now you can edit webcopy, change text size, and remove images. Once you’re done you can either convert your text to a PDF file, email or print it.

HR professional HR at your fingertipsHR at Your Fingertips ($1.99)
We’d never seen an app custom-tailored to the HR professional until last week when we stumbled upon HR at Your Fingertips. In addition to helpful walkthroughs on how to write an employee handbook, this mobile app also contains a law definition database and a common HR term glossary containing over 270 terms and definitions.

HR Professional CorkboardmeCorkboard Me ($5.00/month with a free, 30-day trial)
This app is perfect for HR professionals who are collaborating on a project. Want to share an idea? Simply type it up on a virtual post-it note and attach it to your team’s online “corkboard.” In addition to this, users can share PDFs, Powerpoints, sales plans—you name it. Drag and drop images directly on the board or add them to notes as attachments.

 

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Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, HR professional, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, career success, Human Resource Management Infographics, apps for HRM

How to Fall in Love with Your Goals

Posted on Thu, Feb 14, 2013 @ 09:02 AM

"Although many of us have goals, few have made a love connection to them. Without a connection, goals can easily become meaningless burdens or dreams we never accomplish”.

- Jocelyn Giangrande

With Valentine’s Day around the corner and love in the air, it’s a great time to fall in love with your New Year’s goals.  Although many of us have goals, few of us have formed a love connection.

Below are three ways to help you get connected to and fall in love:

1.  Be specific:  If you’re familiar with SMART goals, you know about being specific.  However, we often underestimate the importance of this step.  When we write goals, many of us believe they’re specific enough to get us moving. I beg to differ.   Check out the difference between a basic goal and a specific goal:

Basic Goal:  To purchase a condo. 

Specific Goal: To purchase a detached split-level condo in 12 months with 2-3 bedrooms, 2 baths, in Oakland county, for $125,000, etc………….. (You get the point).

The more specific, the more you’re able to see yourself accomplishing the goal and you can plan strategically. That brings you and your goal closer together.

2.  Answer “Why?”  Few of us answer the question “Why?” we have the goal in the first place. Why is the goal important and what are you trying to accomplish?  Answering them brings meaning to your goals and helps ensure that what you’re working on and trying to accomplish, are aligned.  It also helps to prioritize.  That way you work on what really matters.

3.  Make it visible.  Motivational speaker Tony Robbins once said;  “Goals make the invisible, visible.”  I would add, “Only if you can see it.” Therefore, visualize yourself accomplishing the goal. how it feels, how it looks. Get as vivid as possible.  This practice helps make an emotional connection and bring it to life.

Just having a goal is not enough.  Falling in love, makes it attainable, meaningful, and emotionally engaging.  That goes a long way in bringing you closer to it and the love connection that makes it worthwhile.

Jocelyn Giangrande

Our monthly guest blogger, Jocelyn Giangrande, is a Marygrove Human Resource Management alumna who not only owns her own company, SASHE, LLC, but has over 15 years of corporate experience. Her career advice and guidance have been featured in Women’s Day, HR Magazine; she is also the author of What’s In Your Sandwich? 10 Surefire Ingredients for Career Success.

Topics: Graduate Programs for Human Resources, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, career success

5 Steps to Make Linked In Work for You

Posted on Wed, Sep 19, 2012 @ 12:09 PM

Linkedin Job SearchWhen it comes to social networking, many professionals say they don’t have a clue if they are doing it right.  And those who do use it don’t always feel that they are getting anything out of it.

The truth is, social networking/media does work.  In fact, I received speaking engagements, clients and job leads all from Linked In.  How?  By following these 5 simple steps.

Step1:   Make an eye-catching profile.  Believe it or not, your profile is the most important real estate on Linked In.  It is (or should be) your mini commercial.  Make sure it outlines in a succinct way, what you do, whom you do it for and what results you’ve achieved.  You should also keep in mind that your public profile (if you select “full view”) will show up on Google searches.  Therefore, you want it to encourage others to seek further information about you and to make a connection.

Step 2:  Use keywords throughout your profile. Be sure to use relevant keywords for your industry or profession.  Many recruiters and professionals conduct keyword searches.  You want to make sure that they find you.  A great way to find keywords is to look at the profiles of others who do the same work as you.  Check out job postings by recruiters on Linked In and see what terminology they use.

Step 3.  Update often. Be sure to update your status often with relevant information.  A great way to drive business is to include updates on things you’re working on, when you obtain new business accounts or your recent successes.  Whenever a client of mine is successful in obtaining a job due to us working together, I include that in my updates.

Step 4: Don’t be bashful about including your past. The mistake I see often is when new users put only their current company in their profile. By doing so, they limit their ability to connect with people from the past. Be sure to include past companies, education, affiliations, and activities.  You will be surprised how much your connections will grow by doing so.

Step 5:  Join groups and participate in discussions. It’s worth it to join groups as long as they are relevant, professional and about helping the members.  I have joined groups in the past where the members were all trying to sell to each other.  I hate that.  Instead find groups where the members are about supporting each other.  Then get engaged by sharing your expertise.  I love helping others solve problems.  By doing so, it led to an opportunity to co-author a book!

Big Tip:  Be sure to post your photo!  There is nothing worse than receiving an invitation to connect by a faceless person.

If you want to obtain the true benefits of Linked In, you must socialize and get involved.  Think of it this way, if you went to a networking event and didn’t talk to anyone, would you be surprised when you didn’t gain any new contacts?  The same is true with social networking.

Most of us post our information and wait.  If only it were that easy.  Unfortunately, this tool doesn’t take away the “work” out of networking.  However, it does do its job in helping you connect to the world if you so desire.

Check out these other helpful links for tips:

10 Linked in Tips for Professionals

7 Ways to Get More Out of Linked In

50 Linked Tips, Many Which are Awesome

Linked In for Job Seekers

Our monthly guest blogger, Jocelyn Giangrande, is a Marygrove Human Resource Management alumna who not only owns her own company, SASHE, LLC, but has over 15 years of corporate experience. Her career advice and guidance have been featured in Women’s Day, HR Magazine; she is also the author of What’s In Your Sandwich? 10 Surefire Ingredients for Career Success.

jocelyn giangrande1

Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, career success, Human Resource Management Infographics

2 Office Infographics to Brighten Up Your Thursday Afternoon

Posted on Thu, Sep 13, 2012 @ 12:09 PM

Although we usually blog about the more serious side of Human Resource Management, we thought we'd lay low this week and share a couple of our favorite office infographics with you. Click on the thumbnails to view a larger image.

Inside The Mind Of A HR Manager 01

HRM infographic

 If you're looking for affordable human resource masters programs, learn more about Marygrove College's online Master of Arts degree in Human Resource Management (HRM) .  You might also be interested in knowing that we have reduced tuition by 19 percent for the 2012-2013 academic year!

 

Download our Human Resource  Management Factsheet

Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, Human Resource Management Infographics

5 Tips for Facilitating Effective Performance Reviews

Posted on Sat, Sep 08, 2012 @ 08:09 AM

Performance ReviewUtter “performance review” and watch the faces sour. The reaction is not without good reason either. The stereotypical performance review often feels like a top-down, mechanically delivered assessment: The employer does the talking while the silent employee is picked apart…which is precisely why they have such a bad reputation.

But performance reviews don’t have to be painful; in fact, they can even be something that both employee and employer look forward to. Here are 5 tips to make your performance review not only painless, but productive.

5 Tips for Facilitating Effective Performance Reviews

1. Look at performance reviews as an opportunity to enter into a partnership
When you skip the antiquated, top-down model and instead address your employees’ feelings and frustrations, you’ll see more buy in. And more often than not, you’ll also see changes in their behavior and productivity which is ultimately the point of a performance review in the first place, isn’t it? People respond to tactless criticism in kind. However, if your employee senses that you understand her point of view—even if you do not agree with it—you will more easily be able to coach her and offer suggestions for how she might do things differently.

2. Base your review on specific and documented observations
You’re busy, but running a performance review off the cuff is unproductive. It can also be disastrous. All employers essentially want the same thing: Happy, productive workers and a profitable business. But a carelessly run review undermines these goals; it can also cause one of your most valuable employees to rethink their devotion to the company and you.

    Keep a working file and include a list of every employee’s significant accomplishments (and shortcomings). Also include a detailed description of the employee’s job and what it would look like if it was performed exactly right. Doing this will provide you with a rubric for evaluating each employee; you’ll also be able to use it as a coaching device to model how your employee could improve.

    3. Schedule interim performance reviews
    Like all relationships, the ones you have with employees need to be maintained and nurtured. If we all share a common goal (to have happy, productive employees), why would we evaluate their happiness and productivity only once a year? Instead, try scheduling informal monthly reviews to establish and assess goals. If you think of these as collaborative, give-and-take conversations, there’s little to dread.

    4. Set the right tone
    Before you begin the performance review, ease into it with some small talk. It’s true, small talk often lacks substance or meaning—but it doesn’t have to.

    Skip talking about the weather or sports. Unless you are both weatherman and sportscaster, it’s unlikely that beginning a meeting by talking about either relates to your shared experiences. Instead, start with questions like this:

    • How does it feel to have completed the __________ project? I imagine that was quite an undertaking.
    • Last week, you mentioned you were going to be vacationing in Florida this October. That will be a great trip. Have you ever been there before?
    5. Focus on an agenda and encourage employee feedback
    No one likes surprises in a performance review, so preface your conversation with an agenda and solicit feedback as you do this. You might say something like this:

    “Here’s what I was thinking we’d do: First, I’d like to give you a summary of the review; then we can cover the details of your strongest points. After that, we can talk about areas where you might improve. Lastly, based on your feedback and on some of my ideas, I’d like to collaborate on setting some future goals and work together to figure out the best way to achieve them. As I’m going through some of this, I want you to feel free to comment and ask questions if you think of any.”

    Effective performance reviews often have as much to do with what happens before “the conversation” as it does during “the conversation.” It’s going to be difficult to solicit feedback and openness if you haven’t been open or established a relationship with your employees before the review.

    If you're looking for affordable human resource masters programs, learn more about Marygrove College's online Master of Arts degree in Human Resource Management (HRM)

    You might also be interested in knowing that we have reduced tuition by 19 percent for the 2012-2013 academic year! 

     

    Download our Human Resource  Management Factsheet

    Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, Engaging Employees, career success, soft skills and etiquette, Office Etiquette, Positive Work Environment

    How Strong is Your Resume? 5 Common Mistakes That Zap Your Power

    Posted on Thu, Aug 30, 2012 @ 09:08 AM

    How Strong is TypewriterResumeYour Resume?  5 Common Mistakes That Zap Your Power
    Whether my client is new to the job market or has several years of professional experience, I see critical mistakes on resumes that are preventing talented professionals from getting noticed. Many things may contribute to your resume being overlooked, tossed or simply not considered.  Therefore, I decided to devote this post to the 5 common mistakes I see.

     


    5 Common Resume Mistakes

    1. Failing to customize your resume to the job.
    Nine times out of ten, I see generic resumes that look like they are created to be mass-produced.  When your generic resume hits an experienced recruiter's mailbox, it sends a message that you don't know what job you want or you are desperate to get whatever job you can.  It also screams that that you don't care to take the time to cater your resume to suit the job.

    Take time to customize your resume to suit the job in which you are applying.  This means using keywords and job experience that is outlined in the job posting.  If you don't take the time to sell yourself, what makes an employer feel confident that you will go above and beyond to do a great job?

    2.  Writing a "Resume Objective" instead of a "Professional Summary."
    Objectives are good for new grads that have no prior work experience.  However, if you have work experience, an "objective" can make you look inexperienced or outdated.

    Professional summaries are usually 2-3 sentences that serve as a mini commercial of your years of experience, expertise and attributes.  Employers are not interested in what you are seeking.  They want to know what you are bringing.

    3.  Outlining your job responsibilities instead of your accomplishments and results.
    Most resumes I review list the job seeker's job responsibilities, often resembling a job description.  Without a list of your accomplishments, results and outcomes, employers don't know what you can potentially do for them if hired.  You should include 3-5 accomplishments for every job you list on your professional resume. This is critical to getting noticed.

     4.  Dating yourself. 
    Believe it or not, many of us still put dates on our resumes that tell our age, especially in the education section.  Although age discrimination is illegal, you don't want to provide any information that could present an opportunity for biases.  This also includes younger job seekers as well.  Some people have biases to younger professionals because they may see them as inexperienced.  Therefore, leave graduation dates off your resume.

    5.  Missing keywords.
    It’s important to include current keywords for your industry and profession.  This is especially important if you have been working in a job for many years or seeking to transition to a new field.  Also be sure to include keywords that are stated in the job posting.  This will help recruiters find your resume during keyword searches and it also reinforces that you are a fit for the job.
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    The biggest mistake of all!

    Waiting until you need a job to update your resume. 
    Don't wait until you need a job to start on your resume.  You never know when an opportunity may arise and you will need one quick.  A strong resume takes time and nothing is more frustrating than trying to write a powerful resume on short notice.  

    With many of us out in the job market, standing out from the crowd is challenging but imperative.  Be sure to avoid these common mistakes and help move your resume to the top.

    Our monthly guest blogger, Jocelyn Giangrande, is a Marygrove Human Resource Management alumna who not only owns her own company, SASHE, LLC, but has over 15 years of corporate experience. Her career advice and guidance have been featured in Women’s Day, HR Magazine; she is also the author of What’s In Your Sandwich? 10 Surefire Ingredients for Career Success.

     

    Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, career success

    Succession Planning & Developing Employees Before the Chaos Ensues

    Posted on Fri, Aug 10, 2012 @ 09:08 AM

    Passing the BatonSuccession planning. It’s an HR buzz phrase, but what does it mean, exactly? Author Christee Gabour Atwood describes it simply as “having the right people in the right place at the right time.” Let’s be more specific: Succession planning is the ongoing process of identifying and training future leaders to transition into those roles so they’re ready when the shoe drops.

    Let’s begin with an analogy:

    Jeb, the vice president of sales, was unhappy in his position and just gave his two-week notice. He’ll work five of those days; on the second week, he’ll decide to stay home and watch seasons 1-8 of The Cosby Show. After that, he’ll return to his former employer, but not without taking Serge (your company’s silver-tongued salesman) with him. In the meantime, quiet desperation in the human resource office ensues.

    This is a common scenario, but it doesn’t have to be. Most of us know that the system of placing ads and making calls—particularly during the two-week scramble before Jeb and Serge make their exit—is not the most efficient way of finding the ideal candidate for the position. This is why you should be developing employees you already have to take on Jeb and Serge’s job.

    Without further ado, here are five succession planning tips to help you in developing employees:

    Succession Planning Tip #1 – The Team Must be Diverse
    A successful succession development planning project team must include people throughout the organization who are familiar with the key positions and the skills and experience required for them.

    Succession Planning Tip #2 – The Team Must Have Support
    The team needs the support of upper management. They must understand the organization’s strategic plan, and must know how to develop a written succession plan. The team must establish clear objectives, define key competencies, identify candidate sources, establish and implement actions and measures for goals, and monitor and evaluate the plan regularly.

    This team may benefit from outside assistance from a business consultant or a small business administration training session.

    Succession Planning Tip #3 – The Team Must Have a Strong Lead
    Team members may be assigned or may be volunteers, but a strong project team lead is required to focus the team’s efforts. Once the succession team has been assembled, a regular meeting schedule should be established, roles should be defined, and areas of the organization assigned. Project team members may work independently or in pairs on specific key positions, reviewing job descriptions, learning about qualifications, and sourcing candidates.

    Succession Planning Tip #4 - A Succession Plan is a Dynamic Document
    A succession plan is not a static document. It is a dynamic, living document; thus, the team must be a dynamic, responsive group when developing and implementing it. Circumstances in your company or industry may change while the succession planning team is forming, while they are establishing objectives, or after they have almost completed the plan and implementation. They must be able to stay flexible and open to the needs of the business and in tune to the company’s strategic plan.

    Re-evaluating key positions regularly with upper management and front-line supervisors is essential. The succession plan may even need to be a part of the company strategic plan to be closely aligned with business goals.

    Succession Planning Tip #5 – Succession Planning Requires Monitoring
    Continuously monitor the team’s activities and results. Collect data on  

    • the number and frequency of vacant positions filled over time
    • the quality of candidates’ performance during their first year
    • a comparison of talent sources
    •  turnover statistics
    • how long it takes to fill open positions.

    Although it is best practice for succession planning to happen in a team, this is not always possible and can still be accomplished in other ways.  

    Are you interested in enhancing your knowledge in the fields of business and human resource solutions? If you're looking for affordable human resource masters programs, learn more about Marygrove College's online Master of Arts degree in Human Resource Management (HRM) program

    You might also be interested in knowing that we have reduced tuition by 19 percent for the 2012 academic year! 

     


    Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, Engaging Employees, career success

    5 Successful Interview Techniques to Remedy Your Wrongdoings

    Posted on Thu, Aug 02, 2012 @ 10:08 AM

    Job InterviewThe success of any company or institution depends on the quality, competency and commitment of the people it hires to represent it. Authors Sandra Hochel and Charmaine Wilson have put it aptly in their book, Hiring Right: Conducting Successful Searches in Higher Education: “Hiring good people is axiomatic: No one questions its importance.”

    If it’s “axiomatic” as Hochel and Wilson suggest, why is it then that so many of us continue to fumble our way through the hiring process by talking about ourselves, asking closed-ended questions and coming to the interview unprepared?

    5 successful interview techniques to remedy your wrongdoings

    1. Write up an interview scorecard—BEFORE the interview
    This little piece of paper should outline all of the characteristics you want in a "perfect" candidate. You owe it to yourself to hold prospective employees to a set of high standards. We do wish to emphasize that if you are going to maintain high standards, do the same for yourself: Spend time with this list; don’t dash it off on the way from the elevator to the conference room.

    2. Ask open-ended questions
    Another indispensable edict of successful interview techniques is to stop asking simple yes-or-no questions; we call these closed-ended questions. Notice the difference between asking an interviewee these two questions:

     Open-Ended Question: "So can you tell me about a conflict you had at work and how you resolved that conflict?"

    Closed-Ended Question: "Do you typically get along with your coworkers?"

    Take a look at the closed-ended question; notice how you’ve not only encouraged a one-word answer, but you’ve also prompted the interviewee to agree with you?

    3. Follow up your questions
    Just because you're not using closed-ended questions doesn't mean you've honed a successful interview technique. Even open-ended questions often yield alluring and prepackaged answers. Don't settle for the first response, even if it is well articulated and convincing. Dig for more info and always follow up with at least one more question.

    4. Be Quiet. Be an interviewer. Don’t Be a Coach
    One upon a time, there was a lower-tier manager—let's call him Bud. Bud was habitually irritated because his bosses always seemed to be charmed by unqualified, prospective employees.

    Here's what would happen: Bud, who asked open-ended questions, would conduct the first interview. His manager would run a follow-up interview without Bud present. Finally, the president (who always seemed to be impressed with everyone) would interview the candidate and declare that he had found the perfect fit.

    How did the candidate continue to pass through the ranks and charm each manager?

    The hiring managers spent their time selling their company and airing their own list of accomplishments instead of interviewing the candidate. The interviewee, seeing this, grinned away and continued to hone his sales pitch for the rest of the day.

    5. Include a Partner Who Shares the Same Set of Goals
    It's crucial for interviewers and hiring managers to partner with others who share the same objective, but approach things differently. Let's say that one interviewer is more susceptible to making hiring decisions based on personality alone; he or she should be teamed up with a more systematic associate: someone who can target facts instead of personality types.

    Interviewing with a partner allows you the breathing room to reflect on the candidates answers before formulating your own questions. It also allows you to collaborate with your interview partner by asking connected questions that interrogate the applicant's real successes.

    Are you interested in enhancing your knowledge in the fields of business and human resource solutions? If you're looking for affordable human resource masters programs, learn more about Marygrove College's online Master of Arts degree in Human Resource Management (HRM) program. 

    You might also be interested in knowing that we have reduced tuition by 19 percent for the 2012 academic year! 

    Download our Human Resource  Management Factsheet                                                                                       

    Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, Engaging Employees, soft skills and etiquette, Office Etiquette

    An UNcommon Sense Employee Retention and Engagement Strategy: Just Ask.

    Posted on Thu, Jul 26, 2012 @ 09:07 AM

    Human Resource Management Comic“Employee retention and engagement is important to us. We want to know what makes you stay with the company? Is there anything that would entice you to leave our company?”

    Have you ever been bold enough to ask your all-star (or even your marginally-performing) employees these two questions? If you haven’t, we can probably guess what you’d say if we asked you why?

    • I didn’t want to put her on the spot; I didn’t want to make him feel uncomfortable.
    • I don’t want him to quit; I didn’t want to put the idea of leaving into his head either.
    • She is always upbeat and consistently produces great work; I didn’t think I needed to ask.

    (Don’t Just) Show Me the Money
    Monetary rewards or bonuses are nice. Have you ever heard of an employee so unabashedly red-cheeked and modest to turn down a raise? Honestly, have you ever had an employee say, “You know, I think I’m actually making too much money?” These are rhetorical questions, of course.  

    The point is, sure, cash will please them; it may even help boost short-term employee retention and engagement, but it won’t provide you with insight about what makes your rock-star (or low-performing) employee “tick.” If you’re doing something right, you want to know about it, right? And if you’re doing something wrong, you should still want to know—even if it hurts. How else are you going to fix it?

    The next steps to boost employee retention and engagement
    Here’s a simple plan. Type up an email that says something like this:

    So and so:
    You make a difference to our department and I appreciate your contributions. I’d like to find 15-20 minutes on such and such day to have an informal conversation about some of these questions I’ve listen below.

    • Employee retention and engagement is important to me, so I want to know what makes you stay with the company?
    • Is there anything that would entice you to leave our company?
    • Am I making good use of all of your talents?
    • How might I help you succeed better?
    • Is there anything I could be doing to help you accomplish these things?

    Sending an email a few days before the informal chat will give your employee time to reflect and fully digest the questions. These are not questions either of you should shy away from. More often than not, you’ll find that warm gestures like this (rather than detached cash bonuses) will not only show your employees that you care about them, it will also help boost employee retention and engagement.

    This blog has been adapted from Beverly Kaye and Sharon Jordan-Evans’ book, Love 'Em Or Lose 'Em: Getting Good People to Stay

                     Download our Human Resource  Management Factsheet

    Topics: Certificate in HR Management, Graduate Programs for Human Resources, Human Resource Management, Human Resources Master Programs, Online Courses for Human Resources Management, Engaging Employees, career success, Positive Work Environment

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